Towards a Better Understanding of Gender and Genocide

3 jun 2021 11:00 12:00 ENG

Annabel Higgins (University of London) and Anna Gopsill (University of London and CMI) in conversation with Espen Stokke (University of Bergen).

In international interventions related to genocide, gender is often understood primarily as relating to women. Further, when we think about gendered harms during conflict and genocide, we often think about sexual violence – women are often seen as bodies for reproduction, and men as bodies for fighting. There is still a lot that we don’t know about gender and genocide, and how the two connect. In order to create better interventions to prevent and improve understandings of genocide, we need a more complete understanding of how gender intersects with genocide.

Join the webinar on Zoom. 

Join us as we hear from Annabel Higgins (PhD candidate at the School of Advanced Study, University of London) and Anna Gopsill (PhD candidate at the School of Advanced Study and CMI) about their work on the relationship between gender and genocide. The discussion will be moderated by Espen Stokke (PhD candidate at the University of Bergen). The event is organized by the Centre on Law and Social Transformation and is part of the Transitional Justice in Norway and Beyond seminar series.

 

Anna Gopsill is a part-time Project Adviser at CMI and a PhD candidate in Human Rights at the School of Advanced Studies at the University of London. Her PhD project examines the relationship between conflict-related sexual violence and masculinities - focused on male victims of sexual violence in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Rwanda. She is Associate Editor at the International Journal for Human Rights. She is also coordinator of the Fritt-Ord funded Transitional Justice in Norway and Beyond seminar series that is based at the Centre on Law and Social Transformation

Espen Stokke is a PhD candidate at the Department of Comparative Politics, University of Bergen. He specializes in diaspora activism related to transitional justice. His PhD project explores the various ways Syrian diasporas mobilize for justice and accountability related to the ongoing Syrian War. He teaches contentious politics and is the coordinator of the UiB research group, Democracy and Development. He is also coordinator of the Fritt-Ord funded Transitional Justice in Norway and Beyond seminar series that is based at the Centre on Law and Social Transformation.

Annabel Higgins is a PhD candidate in Human Rights at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. Her project examines gender perspectives within international criminal law – specifically related to genocide. 
She has previously worked with the British All-Party Parliamentary Group on Human Rights and is currently associate editor for the International Journal of Human Rights. 

 

 

Photo credit: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Yad Vashem (Public Domain)