Breakfast Forum

What are the effects of Chinese development aid?

24 mar 2021 08:30 24 mar 2021 10:00 ENG

Dan Banik (UiO), Sergio Chichava (IESE, Mozambique), Jon Lomøy (former Director General, Norad and former Director of the Development Co-operation Directorate of the OECD), Elling Tjønneland (CMI). 

Join the webinar on zoom. 

China is playing a significant role in providing finance for development in Africa. Part of this is also provided as development assistance – in subsidizing Chinese loans and in providing support for projects in agricultural, health, education and training and more.

How does this aid compare to aid from the traditional Western aid donors? How does this affect global polices and instruments for supporting development? How will the Covid-19 pandemic affect development aid to Africa?

Elling Tjønneland will lead the conversation between Dan Banik, Sergio Chichava and Jon Lomøy.

 

Dan Banik is a Professor of political science at the University of Oslo and head of research at the Center for Development and the Environment. He is also a "consulting scholar" at the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of law at Stanford University, and a visiting professor at China Agriculture University in Bejing, China.

Sergio Chichava is the Director at the Institute of Social and Economic Studies (IESE) in Mozambique, where he leads a research program on rising powers and development. He has published numerous articles and reports on China's role in Mozambique.

Jon Lomøy is the former Director General of Norad and former Director of the Development Co-operation Directorate of the OECD. He has also served as Ambassador of Norway in Zambia and Tanzania. 

Elling Tjønneland is a senior researcher at Chr. Michelsen Institute in Bergen focusing on development and development assistance, rising powers and African development and a strong emphasis on South Africa and Southern Africa. He currently directs a major Norwegian Research Council funded project on Chinese development assistance and the global aid architecture.

 

Photo: Medill DC on flickr.